About 70% of security issues exist in Microsoft products and are patched by security updates related to memory safety ; A Microsoft engineer revealed that at a security conference that took place over the weekend.


The number of security vulnerabilities associated with memory errors has consistently reached 70% during the past 12 years

Microsoft: 70% Of Security Vulnerabilities Cause From Memory Errors

The number of security vulnerabilities associated with memory errors has consistently reached 70% during the past 12 years.

About 70% of security issues exist in Microsoft products and are patched by security updates related to memory safety ; A Microsoft engineer revealed that at a security conference that took place over the weekend.

Memory safety is a term used by software and security engineers to describe applications that access the operating system memory in accordance with the instructions of the system and not cause errors.

Memory-related vulnerabilities occur when software (accidentally or intentionally) accesses system memory beyond the allowed limit or beyond the memory addresses provided.

Those who regularly read security reports must be familiar with these terms. Phrases such as buffer overflow, race condition (too many threads accessing data / resources), page fault (page error), null pointer (empty indicator), stack exhaustion (region exhaustion) memory tiering, heap exhaustion / corruption (exhaustion / heap memory error), use after free or double free (allowing remote code execution if the user interacts with malicious content) - used to describe Memory-related vulnerabilities.

Speaking at the BlueHat Security Conference in Israel last weekend, Microsoft security engineer Matt Miller said over the past 12 years, about 70% of the patches Microsoft released were intended to correct errors related to memory safe.

The reason for this big data is because most of Windows' source code is written in C and C ++, two "memory-insecure" programming languages ​​because it allows programmers to gain control Memory addresses to execute your code. A small error in programmers' memory management code can lead to a series of memory-related errors that attackers can use to cause dangerous and potentially dangerous consequences. High destructive properties, such as remote code execution or activation of high-level privileges.

Memory errors are one of the "abetting" loopholes for hackers at the moment; and hackers also know how to make the most of these loopholes. According to Miller's presentation, use-after-free vulnerabilities (allowing bad guys to attack after users interact with malware) and heap corruption (causing heap memory errors) are many bugs. The most popular attack.

Chart of the number of memory-related vulnerabilities (dark green)

Chart of the number of memory-related vulnerabilities (dark green) compared to the number of non-memory-related vulnerabilities (light blue) by year patched (horizontal axis)

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